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Canadian COVID-19 Emergency Department Rapid Response Network

+198,000 patients enrolled


2,500 records added weekly

3rd largest COVID registry listed by the WHO

 

CCEDRRN

Canadian COVID-19 Emergency Department Rapid Response Network

The Canadian COVID-19 Emergency Department Rapid Response Network (CCEDRRN) is a national collaboration with Public Health partners to harmonize data collection related to COVID-19 in more than 51 Emergency Departments (EDs) across 8 provinces (BC, AB, SK, MB, ON, QC, NS, NB).

To date, CCEDRRN has captured data on over 140,000 patients across Canada, with ongoing weekly accrual of 2,000-2,500 COVID-19 tested patients. This allows us to conduct well-powered investigations on specific populations within Canada.

 

Recent Findings and News

Image by Mufid Majnun

COVID-19 research initiatives at UBC among those funded by first-time partnership

A number of UBC rapid response research initiatives have received funding from a partnership between Genome BC, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, and the BCCDC Foundation for Public Health.

 
Image by Daniel Schludi

Interested in being involved?

CCEDRRN encourages external scientists to be in touch with research proposals in order to maximize the scientific value of the epidemiologic COVID-19 related data that CCEDRRN has collected since 2020.

 

Publications

Read about the current findings from investigators utilizing CCEDRRN participant research data.

Development of the Canadian COVID-19 Emergency Department Rapid Response Network population-based registry: a methodology study (cmajopen.ca)

March 17, 2021

Background: Emergency physicians lack high-quality evidence for many diagnostic and treatment decisions made for patients with suspected or confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our objective is to describe the methods used to collect and ensure the data quality of a multicentre registry of patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected or confirmed COVID-19.

Image by National Cancer Institute